BPM+CRM Software for marketing, sales and service

Process-driven systems and organizations: a process designed for the sales department.

Process-driven systems and organizations: a process designed for the sales department.

On December 5, 2017, Posted by , In CRM operational,News, By ,,, , With No Comments
Process Driven

Process Driven

We at VTECRM are deeply convinced that organizations can be seen as physical systems, and similarly to production (ERP) and accounting (MRP) aspects can be connected to IT systems and thus participate in the industrial revolution currently under way and become part of the IoT world.
Implementing processes related to organizational procedures allows the automation of events that would otherwise require the intervention of an operator, with an ensuing waste of time, higher costs and a high likelihood of errors.

Process-driven systems, on the contrary, allow increased efficiency and efficacy of procedures thanks to a higher level of objectivity and to the possibility of intervening rapidly to tackle critical issues and overcome bottlenecks.
All this leads to a higher level of satisfaction by end customers, who will have their request processed in a shorter time.
The process illustrated below shows how the whole phase can be fully automated, starting with the potential customer sending a request to the sales department and ending with the sales department sending (or not) a quote to the potential customer.


Process

Process


The process starts with a request received by the sales department. The process checks whether the contact exists in the CRM system:
• if the customer is already in the CRM system, their typology is assessed,
• if the customer is not in the CRM system, an e-mail is sent to the administration department requesting feedback.
If the administration department replies in the negative, an e-mail is sent to the contact, informing them that their request could not be accepted, and the process ends.

If the administration department replies positively, an e-mail is sent to the technical department, requesting a feasibility study.
If the outcome of the feasibility study carried out by the technical department* is negative, an e-mail is sent to the contact, informing them that their request could not be accepted, and the process ends. If the outcome is positive, a quote is generated and sent to the potential customer.
Again, two options are available at this point:

• if the potential customer accepts the quote, the production process starts,
• if no response is received from the potential customer within 30 days, the process ends without launching the production process.

Obviously, the process can acquire a higher level of complexity by including a number of sub-processes*.
In the example shown below, a sub-process may refer to automating the technical department’s feasibility study, which in turn will reduce human intervention even more from start to done.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CAPTCHA Image

*